Steroid sensitive nephrotic syndrome

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Cells of the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis lack aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) that converts corticosterone to aldosterone, and thus these tissues produce only the weak mineralocorticoid corticosterone. However, both these zones do contain the CYP17A1 missing in zona glomerulosa and thus produce the major glucocorticoid, cortisol. Zona fasciculata and zona reticularis cells also contain CYP17A1, whose 17,20-lyase activity is responsible for producing the androgens, dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione. Thus, fasciculata and reticularis cells can make corticosteroids and the adrenal androgens, but not aldosterone.

NOT NECESSARILY TRUE . Faced with an unnatural rise in estrogen, some steroid users will then take a class of drugs called aromatase inhibitors , which are designed to block the production of estrogen in women with breast cancer, Weinerman says. That's right: It's a breast cancer drug. And aside from the obvious danger in further messing with hormones, guys who turn to aromatase inhibitors can have side effects like joint and muscle pain, the loss of sex drive, and the loss of bone density, which can then result in osteoporosis, according to a Susan G. Komen Foundation report .

Steroid sensitive nephrotic syndrome

steroid sensitive nephrotic syndrome

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